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Yawei Zhang      
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Yawei Zhang published an article in January 2019.
Top co-authors See all
Stephen Chanock

688 shared publications

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Heal

Nathaniel Rothman

431 shared publications

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics; National Cancer Institute; Rockville Maryland

Qing Lan

366 shared publications

Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics; National Cancer Institute; Rockville Maryland

Peter Boyle

289 shared publications

International Prevention Research Institute, Lyon, France

Tongzhang Zheng

267 shared publications

Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

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Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2005 - 2019)
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30
 
Publications See all
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations A propensity score matched comparison of readmissions and cost of laparoscopic cholecystectomy vs percutaneous cholecyst... Matthew M. Fleming, Michael P. Dewane, Jiajun Luo, Fangfang ... Published: 01 January 2019
The American Journal of Surgery, doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2018.10.047
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 1 Citation TSH, Thyroid Hormone, and PTC—Response Huang Huang, Jennifer Rusiecki, Robert Udelsman, Yawei Zhang Published: 04 February 2018
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-17-0806
DOI See at publisher website
BOOK-CHAPTER 0 Reads 0 Citations Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Thyroid Cancer: A Population Based Case-Control Study in Connecticut Huang Huang, Nan Zhao, Yingtai Chen, Nicole DeZiel, Min Dai,... Published: 01 January 2018
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-98788-0_1
DOI See at publisher website
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Germline Variants in DNA Repair Genes, Diagnostic Radiation, and Risk of Thyroid Cancer Jason E Sandler, Huang Huang, Nan Zhao, Weiwei Wu, Fangfang ... Published: 20 December 2017
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-17-0319
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed
Article 0 Reads 3 Citations Pre-pregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain and risk of preeclampsia: a birth cohort study in Lanzhou, China Yawen Shao, Jie Qiu, Huang Huang, Baohong Mao, Wei Dai, Xiao... Published: 01 December 2017
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, doi: 10.1186/s12884-017-1567-2
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To evaluate the independent and joint effects of maternal pre-pregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain (GWG) on the risk of preeclampsia and its subtypes. A birth cohort study was conducted from 2010 to 2012 in Lanzhou, China. Three hundred fourty seven pregnant women with preeclampsia and 9516 normotensive women at Gansu Provincial Maternity and Child Care Hospital were included in the present study. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to evaluate the associations between pre-pregnancy BMI, GWG, and risk of preeclampsia and its subtypes. Compared to women with normal pre-pregnancy BMI, those who were overweight/obese had an increased risk of preeclampsia (OR = 1.81; 95%CI: 1.37–2.39). Women with excessive GWG had an increased risk of preeclampsia (OR = 2.28; 95%CI: 1.70–3.05) compared to women with adequate GWG. The observed increased risk was similar for mild-, severe- and late-onset preeclampsia. No association was found for early-onset preeclampsia. Overweight/obese women with excessive GWG had the highest risk of developing preeclampsia compared to normal weight women with no excessive weight gain (OR = 3.78; 95%CI: 2.65–5.41). Our results suggested that pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG are independent risk factors for preeclampsia and that the risk might vary by preeclampsia subtypes. Our study also proposed a potential synergistic effect of pre-pregnancy BMI and GWG that warrants further investigation.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations Maternal folic acid supplementation and dietary folate intake and congenital heart defects Baohong Mao, Jie Qiu, Nan Zhao, Yawen Shao, Wei Dai, Xiaochu... Published: 16 November 2017
PLOS ONE, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0187996
DOI See at publisher website PubMed View at PubMed ABS Show/hide abstract
It has been reported that folic acid supplementation before and/or during pregnancy could reduce the risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs). However, the results from limited epidemiologic studies have been inconclusive. We investigated the associations between maternal folic acid supplementation, dietary folate intake, and the risk of CHDs. A birth cohort study was conducted in 2010–2012 at the Gansu Provincial Maternity & Child Care Hospital in Lanzhou, China. After exclusion of stillbirths and multiple births, a total of 94 births were identified with congenital heart defects, and 9,993 births without any birth defects. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the associations. Compared to non-users, folic acid supplement users before pregnancy had a reduced risk of overall CHDs (OR: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.21–0.86, Ptrend = 0.025) after adjusted for potential confounders. A protective effect was observed for certain subtypes of CHDs (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.16–0.85 for malformation of great arteries; 0.26, 0.10–0.68 for malformation of cardiac septa; 0.34, 0.13–0.93 for Atrial septal defect). A similar protective effect was also seen for multiple CHDs (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.26–0.93, Ptrend = 0.004). Compared with the middle quartiles of dietary folate intake, lower dietary folate intake (<149.88 μg/day) during pregnancy were associated with increased risk of overall CHDs (OR: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.01–2.62) and patent ductus arteriosus (OR: 1.85, 95% CI: 1.03–3.32). Women who were non-user folic acid supplement and lower dietary folate intake have almost 2-fold increased CHDs risk in their offspring. Our study suggested that folic acid supplementation before pregnancy was associated with a reduced risk of CHDs, lower dietary folate intake during pregnancy was associated with increased risk. The observed associations varied by CHD subtypes. A synergistic effect of dietary folate intake and folic acid supplementation was also observed.
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