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Iseult Lynch      
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Iseult Lynch published an article in January 2019.
Top co-authors See all
Kenneth A. Dawson

291 shared publications

Centre for BioNano Interactions, School of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Conway Institute for Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin D14 YH57, Ireland

Damjana Drobne

128 shared publications

Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana 1000, Slovenia;(D.D.);(S.N.);(A.J.K.)

Albert Duschl

127 shared publications

Department of Biosciences, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria

Georgia Melagraki

88 shared publications

Nanoinformatics Department

Mária Dusinská

85 shared publications

Health Effects Laboratory, Department of Environmental Chemistry, Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU), Kjeller, Norway

141
Publications
8
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1
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2023
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Publication Record
Distribution of Articles published per year 
(2003 - 2018)
Total number of journals
published in
 
35
 
Publications See all
Article 1 Read 0 Citations Plant species-dependent transformation and translocation of ceria nanoparticles Peng Zhang, Yuhui Ma, Changjian Xie, Zhiling Guo, Xiao He, E... Published: 01 January 2019
Environmental Science: Nano, doi: 10.1039/c8en01089g
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Different plant species respond differently to nCeO2 under different culturing conditions: for some, deficiency of P enhances the accumulation of Ce (mainly Ce3+) and phytotoxicity.
Article 0 Reads 0 Citations A safe-by-design tool for functionalised nanomaterials through the Enalos Nanoinformatics Cloud platform Dimitra Danai Varsou, Antreas Afantitis, Andreas Tsoumanis, ... Published: 01 January 2019
Nanoscale Advances, doi: 10.1039/c8na00142a
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A validated nanoinformatics model for accurate prediction of the biological and toxicological profile of ligand-decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes is released online for safe-by-design decision making.
Article 1 Read 0 Citations Abundance, Distribution, and Drivers of Microplastic Contamination in Urban River Environments Joseph Tibbetts, Stefan Krause, Iseult Lynch, Gregory Sambro... Published: 07 November 2018
Water, doi: 10.3390/w10111597
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Given the persistence of microplastics in the environment and their potential toxicity to ecosystems, understanding of likely microplastic accumulation ‘hotspots’ in rivers is urgently needed. To contribute to this challenge, this paper reports results of a microplastic survey from a heavily urbanised catchment, the River Tame and four of its tributaries, which flows through the city of Birmingham, UK. All sediment sampled was found to contain microplastics with an average abundance of 165 particles kg−1. While urban areas generally have a greater abundance of microplastics as compared with rural, there is no simple relationship between microplastic numbers and population density or proximity to wastewater treatment sites. The greatest change in microplastic abundance was due to the presence of a lake along the course of the River Tame—i.e., flow velocities are reduced on entering the lake, which promotes the deposition of fine sediment and potentially microplastics. This suggests that the greatest concentrations of microplastics will not be found in-channel but rather on the floodplain and other low velocity environments such as meander cutoffs. We also identified a new mechanism of microplastic fixation in freshwater environments through ecological engineers, specifically caddisflies, that incorporated microplastics into their casing. These results highlight the need to explore further hydrodynamic and ecological impacts on microplastics fate and transport in rivers.
PREPRINT 2 Reads 0 Citations Abundance, Distribution and Drivers of Microplastic Contaminant in Urban River Environments Joe Tibbetts, Stefan Krause, Iseult Lynch, Gregory H. Sambro... Published: 10 September 2018
doi: 10.20944/preprints201809.0172.v1
DOI See at publisher website ABS Show/hide abstract
Given the persistence of microplastics in the environment and their potential toxicity to ecosystems, understanding of likely microplastic accumulation ‘hotspots’ in rivers is urgently needed. To contribute to this challenge, this paper reports results of a microplastic survey from a heavily urbanised catchment, the River Tame, which flows through the city of Birmingham, UK. All sediment sampled was found to contain microplastics with an average abundance of 165 particles kg-1. While urban areas generally have a greater abundance of microplastics as compared with rural, there is no simple relationship between microplastic numbers and population density or proximity to wastewater treatment sites. The greatest change in microplastic abundance was due to the presence of a lake along the course of the River Tame i.e. on entering the lake flow velocities are reduced which promotes the deposition of fine sediment and potentially microplastics. This suggests that the greatest concentrations of microplastics will not be found in-channel but rather on the floodplain and other low velocity environments such as meander cutoffs. We also identified a new mechanism of microplastic fixation in freshwater environments through ecological engineers, specifically caddisfly that incorporated microplastics into their casing. These results highlight the need to explore further hydrodynamic and ecological impacts on microplastics fate and transport in rivers.
Article 3 Reads 1 Citation A nanoinformatics decision support tool for the virtual screening of gold nanoparticle cellular association using protei... Antreas Afantitis, Georgia Melagraki, Andreas Tsoumanis, Eug... Published: 05 September 2018
Nanotoxicology, doi: 10.1080/17435390.2018.1504998
DOI See at publisher website
PREPRINT 0 Reads 0 Citations Physicochemical Characterization of Biomass Residue–Derived Biochars in Vietnam Nguyen Van Hien, Eugenia Valsami-Jones, Nguyen Cong Vinh, To... Published: 22 July 2018
EARTH SCIENCES, doi: 10.20944/preprints201807.0403.v1
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This study compares the physico-chemical characteristics of three different types of biochar produced from biomass residues in Vietnam as a basis for optimising their application in water purification and soil fertilisation.  Wood biochar (WBC), rice husk biochar (RBC), and bamboo biochar (BBC) were produced under limited oxygen conditions using equipment available locally in Vietnam, known as a Top-Lid Updraft Drum (TLUD). The resulting biochars were characterised using a suite of state-of-the-art methods to understand their morphology, surface chemistry and cation exchange capacity.  Surface areas (measured by BET) for WBC and BBC were 479.34 m2/g and 434.53 m2/g, respectively, significantly higher than that of RBC which was only 3.29 m2/g.  The morphology as shown in SEM images corresponds with the BET surface area, showing a smooth surface for RBC, a hollow surface for BBC, and a rough surface for WBC.  All three biochars produced alkaline, with pH values around 10, and all have high carbon contents (47.95 - 82.1 %).  Cation exchange capacity (CEC) was significantly different (p<0.05) among the biochars, being 26.70 cmol/kg for RBC, 20.7 cmol/kg for BBC, and 13.53 cmol/kg for WBC, which relates to the cations (Ca, Mg, K) and functional groups with negative charge (carboxyl, hydroxyl) present on the biochar surfaces.  The highest contents of Ca, Mg and K in rice husk BC may explain its highest CEC values.  Thus, although the biochars were produced by the same method, the various feedstocks lead to quite different physico-chemical properties.  Ongoing work is linking these physico-chemical properties to the biochar efficiencies in terms of nitrate and ammonia capture capacities for use as fertilisers, and for adsorption of heavy metals (Zn, Cu) or water filtration, in order to design optimal biochar properties for specific applications.
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